Accosted Darling

seeing life with a vengance

37 notes

youneedacat:

At The Back Of The North Wind was an extremely important book for me.  On the surface, it’s a fantasy story about a boy who gets approached by the North Wind, who takes him on adventures around the world (some exhilarating, some terrifying, some both), and then starts asking some things of him that are extremely difficult.
Under the surface, it’s George MacDonald trying to come to terms with the loss of his son, who the main character is modeled off of.
Some people might not like it because it has some Victorian novel clichés about sick kids.  I liked it a lot.  I felt like it spoke to some deeper experiences I was having as a result of severe, life-threatening illness.  Like even though it never said it outright, it talked about what it’s like to have death sitting in the room with you, waiting patiently for you to be ready.  And a number of other experiences that can only be sensed, not explained in language.  Which is what made George MacDonald such a genius of a writer — he could get at those places that can only be sensed, and do it with words.  
The story is beautiful, and chilling (as the North wind should be), and heartbreaking, and I related so much to it when I read it in the hospital on my Kindle.  It’s also free online just about everywhere, because it’s quite old and copyright doesn’t apply.
George MacDonald’s books are like… Madeleine L’Engle, or Michael Ende, or Diane Duane.   They always have deeper layers to them. layers of meaning you’re not going to see if you just look on the surface.  But you can feel them down there.  And they’re important layers.  They’re real things about the world that the book is trying to show you without being too obvious about it.  And these authors do it beautifully.
There is something about this book that just thoroughly and totally resonates with my experiences of delirium and life-threatening illness, even though those are not topics explicitly covered in the book.  They’re entirely done by metaphor and layers and stuff like that.
But I’d strongly recommend you give it a try, if you’re at all interested in these experiences.  Because… I don’t know how to explain, but it’s like it immerses you in feelings that are familiar from illness, without actually talking about the child ever being ill all that much, from what I remember.  It amazes me when an author has that kind of talent.  And maybe I’m talking this book up too much and you’ll be disappointed, but I find it hard to be disappointed by nearly anything George MacDonald has ever written.
I really need to reread this now that I’m out the other side.  There are so many books that got me through the “I might be dying” period — At the Back of the North Wind is one of them, The Fault in Our Stars was another, which I just reread as a book on tape, and saw the movie when it came out (the movie was disappointingly bland, but I’m still glad I went).  
I find that the Victorians understood things about sickness that we’ve forgotten these days now that we lock it up in hospitals and nursing homes.  They understood things about delirium, things about death, things about illness, because for better or worse they saw these things happening in front of them, there were no antibiotics, even a routine infection could result in both delirium and death.  
And it comes out in their novels, and I look for it, because I look for people who understand, even if they’ve been dead for over a hundred years, what does time have to do with it?   What matters is they understand things I’ve gone through that I can’t find any decent support for in modern times.  And this book was one of those books where I found understanding, even if the understanding was always under the surface somewhere where I couldn’t quite get at it.

This is a beautiful tribute to a beautiful book.

youneedacat:

At The Back Of The North Wind was an extremely important book for me.  On the surface, it’s a fantasy story about a boy who gets approached by the North Wind, who takes him on adventures around the world (some exhilarating, some terrifying, some both), and then starts asking some things of him that are extremely difficult.

Under the surface, it’s George MacDonald trying to come to terms with the loss of his son, who the main character is modeled off of.

Some people might not like it because it has some Victorian novel clichés about sick kids.  I liked it a lot.  I felt like it spoke to some deeper experiences I was having as a result of severe, life-threatening illness.  Like even though it never said it outright, it talked about what it’s like to have death sitting in the room with you, waiting patiently for you to be ready.  And a number of other experiences that can only be sensed, not explained in language.  Which is what made George MacDonald such a genius of a writer — he could get at those places that can only be sensed, and do it with words.  

The story is beautiful, and chilling (as the North wind should be), and heartbreaking, and I related so much to it when I read it in the hospital on my Kindle.  It’s also free online just about everywhere, because it’s quite old and copyright doesn’t apply.

George MacDonald’s books are like… Madeleine L’Engle, or Michael Ende, or Diane Duane.   They always have deeper layers to them. layers of meaning you’re not going to see if you just look on the surface.  But you can feel them down there.  And they’re important layers.  They’re real things about the world that the book is trying to show you without being too obvious about it.  And these authors do it beautifully.

There is something about this book that just thoroughly and totally resonates with my experiences of delirium and life-threatening illness, even though those are not topics explicitly covered in the book.  They’re entirely done by metaphor and layers and stuff like that.

But I’d strongly recommend you give it a try, if you’re at all interested in these experiences.  Because… I don’t know how to explain, but it’s like it immerses you in feelings that are familiar from illness, without actually talking about the child ever being ill all that much, from what I remember.  It amazes me when an author has that kind of talent.  And maybe I’m talking this book up too much and you’ll be disappointed, but I find it hard to be disappointed by nearly anything George MacDonald has ever written.

I really need to reread this now that I’m out the other side.  There are so many books that got me through the “I might be dying” period — At the Back of the North Wind is one of them, The Fault in Our Stars was another, which I just reread as a book on tape, and saw the movie when it came out (the movie was disappointingly bland, but I’m still glad I went).  

I find that the Victorians understood things about sickness that we’ve forgotten these days now that we lock it up in hospitals and nursing homes.  They understood things about delirium, things about death, things about illness, because for better or worse they saw these things happening in front of them, there were no antibiotics, even a routine infection could result in both delirium and death.  

And it comes out in their novels, and I look for it, because I look for people who understand, even if they’ve been dead for over a hundred years, what does time have to do with it?   What matters is they understand things I’ve gone through that I can’t find any decent support for in modern times.  And this book was one of those books where I found understanding, even if the understanding was always under the surface somewhere where I couldn’t quite get at it.

This is a beautiful tribute to a beautiful book.

Filed under george macdonald at the back of the north wind dead and dying children

8,502 notes

agonyandagony:

"WHAT WOULD RYAN LOCHTE DO" IS THE BEST SHOW ON TELEVISION AND THE VOICE OF OUR GENERATION AND THE TRUEST SWEETEST SONG OF MY SOUL AND IF YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND THAT THAN YOU WILL NEVER UNDERSTAND ME

(via dramabuttons)

Filed under jfc

4 notes

You know that green booze they’re always drinking on Battlestar Galactica? Well, today my father and I went out and bought this:

Now we are drinking it out of wine glasses, because that’s how they drink it in the show.  It tastes exactly like watermelon-bubblegum-flavored cough syrup, just way we like it.

Filed under bsg booze living in the future

3 notes

10 Plays
Bear McCreary
Kara Remembers

The music in this show kicked ass. Its narratives for its female characters also kicked ass, but that’s another post for another time.

Filed under bsg starbuck 5ever etc

926 notes

alicexz:

“They might want to laugh, but the smile would be slow to come. They might want to cry, but the tears wouldn’t well up till the next day…” – 2046 (2004)
Continuing my sci-fi series… painting inspired by Wong Kar-Wai’s beautiful 2046. The color palette of this film is almost entirely deep reds, sea greens, and yellows, so I painted accordingly. (Quite a difficult color scheme to use convincingly without it all being a garish mess, LEMME TELL YOU….) This is Faye Wong’s delayed-reaction android character.
Limited edition prints are available here.

alicexz:

They might want to laugh, but the smile would be slow to come. They might want to cry, but the tears wouldn’t well up till the next day…” – 2046 (2004)

Continuing my sci-fi series… painting inspired by Wong Kar-Wai’s beautiful 2046. The color palette of this film is almost entirely deep reds, sea greens, and yellows, so I painted accordingly. (Quite a difficult color scheme to use convincingly without it all being a garish mess, LEMME TELL YOU….) This is Faye Wong’s delayed-reaction android character.

Limited edition prints are available here.

Filed under 2046 hong kong movies

2 notes

Sometimes when I go running I run down “Cat Street,” which is what I call it because it is a street that has many cats living on it. Only one of these cats will come up to greet me. This friendly cat is not just friendly, but needy and clingy too. Said needy cat has angrily attacked me for walking away, as if punishing me would be a surefire way to make me stay around. Really, cat. Really.

Filed under cats

5 notes

A Book Meme

Book meme rules:

“10+ books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard—they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you”

Tagged by miss-apple-pie
(most of these ended up being books I loved as a kid - it’s weird what sticks with you)

1 - The Lord of the Rings: This one will always be on a list like this.

2 - Les Miserables: My best friend from high school and I read this together in like, 10th grade. Lots of good memories. We both agreed Eponine and Gavroche were the best characters.

3 - Rod Allbright’s Alien Adventures by Bruce Coville. Yes.

4 - The Tripods Trilogy by John Christopher, especially the second book, The City of Gold and Lead. Because I am a 10-year-old boy.

5 - Lilith by George MacDonald. What was this book, even. Who knows. It definitely stuck with me. I think I cried when I read it.

6 - Most anything by Daniel Pinkwater, but especially Borgel because it was the first Daniel Pinkwater book I’d ever read.

7 - The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster. Lots of good and memorable episodes in this book.

8 - The Once and Future King by T.H. White. I am a not-so-secret Arthurian legend fangirl. Not only is this a great retelling, but it’s definitely one of the most delightful and devastating books I’ve ever read.

9 - Trail Partners by Max Brand, which is totally a pseudonym. This is my go-to cheap western and I can read it forever.

10 - The Samurai by Shusaku Endo, because I cried.

11 - Till We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis. Beautifully written, his best book by far imo. It’s also one of the tightest books out there - not a single line or a description or a character or a plot point is wasted or irrelevant.

I tag jiyoungle for either books or films, tigerheartfoxglove, dramabuttons, bananena, and horrible-device if she has the time!

Filed under books