Accosted Darling

seeing life with a vengance

2 notes

docdoggerel:

I keep telling myself I need to reread Silence someday, but then part of me is like ‘dude you can’t afford to be in your feels for two days straight right now’ and it always wins out

Filed under same

76 notes

442 Plays
Cold Mountain
Idumea

kajacana:

"Idumea" from the Cold Mountain soundtrack.

Sacred harp singing, also known as shape note singing, is an early American, a capella type of music.  It allows the beauty of the human voice to shine, no matter how technically “good” the singers are.

It’s a very participatory form of music.  Once I attended a singing in Vermont, and my friends and I were welcomed into the square, no questions asked.  What I heard that night was some of the most immersive, heart-swellingly beautiful music I have ever experienced.

Sacred harp is haunting, uplifting, and pure.  It’s tough to explain - you have to hear it.  There’s a lot on YouTube, although much of it isn’t the best quality.  Try this video for some good examples of more upbeat songs, as well as a visual of what a singing looks like.  And if you ever get a chance to go to a singing, jump on that - the recordings really don’t do it justice.

(via thymey)

Filed under music I didn't know about this! good stuff

40 notes

When the world shook and the sun was wiped out of heaven, it was not at the crucifixion, but at the cry from the cross: the cry which confessed that God was forsaken of God. And now let the revolutionists choose a creed from all the creeds and a god from all the gods of the world, carefully weighing all the gods of inevitable recurrence and of unalterable power. They will not find another god who has himself been in revolt. Nay (the matter grows too difficult for human speech), but let the atheists themselves choose a god. They will find only one divinity who ever uttered their isolation; only one religion in which God seemed for an instant to be an atheist.
G. K. Chesterton

(Source: the-last-crusade, via bonefromthevoid)

Filed under chesterton

228,697 notes

note-a-bear:

aminaabramovic:

everyone needs to watch this video before they log off tonight

well, now I know what I’m doing every time a car alarm goes off

(Source: merakiandmelanin, via meghanmakespatches)

Filed under dancing heroes

5 notes

snailkeeping:

What is he even looking at. What are either of them looking at. What do snails even look at???

It’s funny since snails eyesight is very, very poor, but they’re surprisingly reliant on it and very defensive over their eyes, despite apparently being able to grow them back. I’ve seen snails stare into things they find intimidating and stare into their food. They’re definitely seeing something, but it’s probably black and white and all fuzzy.

Filed under snails

1 note

I am wearing a long-sleeved shirt/hoodie thing that I have had since literally the 4th grade. The 4th grade. It is in remarkably good shape for having been worn for, like, 15 years, with the exception of a few bleach spots on the sleeve from a time I cleaned the toilet.

THE REASON I refuse to get rid of this shirt is because it is a particular shade of reddish-burgundy that I haven’t seen anywhere else. Please come back in style, burgundy, so I can buy a new shirt that is for an adult.

Filed under shirts tru fashionista

4,826 notes

spoliamag:

“Bees are the smallest of birds. They are born from the bodies of oxen, or from the decaying flesh of slaughtered calves; worms form in the flesh and then turn into bees. Bees live in community, choose the most noble among them as king, have wars, and make honey. Their laws are based on custom, but the king does not enforce the law; rather the lawbreakers punish themselves by stinging themselves to death. Bees are afraid of smoke and are excited by noise. Each has its own duty: guarding the food supply, watching for rain, collecting dew to make honey, and making wax from flowers.”
From a medieval bestiary.

spoliamag:

Bees are the smallest of birds. They are born from the bodies of oxen, or from the decaying flesh of slaughtered calves; worms form in the flesh and then turn into bees. Bees live in community, choose the most noble among them as king, have wars, and make honey. Their laws are based on custom, but the king does not enforce the law; rather the lawbreakers punish themselves by stinging themselves to death. Bees are afraid of smoke and are excited by noise. Each has its own duty: guarding the food supply, watching for rain, collecting dew to make honey, and making wax from flowers.”

From a medieval bestiary.

(via thymey)

Filed under what bees old science

2 notes

My mother is coming in a few days and expects an Easter dinner? I’m up for the challenge, but I’m drawing a blank when it comes to Easter dinner food items. Except ham. I’m gonna make a ham for sure. But aside from that, what kind of stuff do you eat for Easter? Or what’s a delicious thing to make in general?

Filed under easter food